Ambrose University





Public Lectures at Ambrose

Introduction

As part of our commitment to being "redemptively engaged" with the world around, Ambrose University is dedicated to providing oportunities for its students, constituents, and surrounding Calgary community to learn from and engage with some of the brightest academics and practitioners in a variety of disciplines on contemporary and relevant issues in society. Below are recordings of recent lectures held on the Ambrose Campus (just click on the lecture title to open), or, click here to access Ambrose Lectures in iTunesU

Chris Wright (Downey Lecture Series)
 

Integral Mission and the Great Commission

More info here

February 10, 2016

February 11, 2016

 

Joel Thiessen, PhD
Associate Professor of Sociology, Ambrose University

The Meaning of Sunday

Sociologists generally agree that Canada is becoming an increasingly secular society. But what is the significance of this shift? In his new book The Meaning of Sunday, Dr. Joel Thiessen, Associate Professor of Sociology at Ambrose University, aims both to sharpen our current understanding of the reasons people participate, or choose not to participate, in church communities in Canada, and to promote a deeper understanding of the Canadian religious and cultural landscape.

November 25, 2015 @ 7:00pm

Amos Yong
Professor of Theology and Mission
Fuller Theological Seminary

 

The Coming Global Christianity: Challenges and Opportunities Part 1 / Part 2

 

The Coming Global Christianity: Challenges and Opportunities

 

 

Reverend Dr. William H. Willimon

Preaching Jesus Christ Today

February 4, 2014

Reverend Dr. William H. Willimon

The God Who Summons

February 3, 2014

 Dr. Mark Boda

Reason and Revelation, Sages in Debate: Discerning God’s Ways in a Sacred World

This presentation focuses on the book of Job, contrasting the two main modes linked to the acquisition of wisdom in the book: the model of wisdom acquired through reception of knowledge from former generations and personal observation and linked to the aged and the model of wisdom acquired through reception of revelation from heavenly sources and linked to the young. The book of Job shows the arrogance of reliance upon either of these sources, and reveals the necessity of a trusting encounter with the God of the Universe to understand this world.

Dr. Mark J. Boda is currently Professor of Old Testament at McMaster Divinity College in Hamilton, Ontario.   Mark joined the College in 2003 after teaching for nine years at what is now Ambrose University College/ Seminary in Calgary (former Canadian Bible College/Canadian Theological Seminary). He has authored 7 books, edited 15 volumes of collected essays, and written over 80 articles on various topics related to the Old Testament and Christian Theology. Key areas of interest include Old Testament Theology, prayer and penitence in Old Testament and Christian Theology, Babylonian and Persian Period Hebrew Books and History (Jeremiah, Lamentations, Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi), the Book of the Twelve (Minor Prophets), Isaiah, and Judges. Mark enjoys mentoring students and teaches with enthusiasm about the Old Testament and its continued relevance to the Christian life today.

As an ordained minister, Mark enjoys preaching throughout Canada and the USA. 

Dr. Boda hold the following degrees: B.Th. from Ambrose University College, Calgary, AB; M.Div. from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, PA and Ph.D. from University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

February 13, 2013

7:00pm

 

Word and Spirit, Prophets and Scribes: Discerning God’s Voice in a Sacred Text

This presentation investigates 4 key texts in the Old Testament, two from the narratives of the Old Testament ( 2 Kings, Nehemiah) and two from the prophets of the Old Testament (Jeremiah, Ezekiel). These texts reveal a joint task between prophets and scribes, uniting the potential of the written word and revelatory spirit. These models are identified as relevant to an emerging hermeneutic which will unite key contemporary renewal movements.

Dr. Mark J. Boda is currently Professor of Old Testament at McMaster Divinity College in Hamilton, Ontario.   Mark joined the College in 2003 after teaching for nine years at what is now Ambrose University College/ Seminary in Calgary (former Canadian Bible College/Canadian Theological Seminary). He has authored 7 books, edited 15 volumes of collected essays, and written over 80 articles on various topics related to the Old Testament and Christian Theology. Key areas of interest include Old Testament Theology, prayer and penitence in Old Testament and Christian Theology, Babylonian and Persian Period Hebrew Books and History (Jeremiah, Lamentations, Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi), the Book of the Twelve (Minor Prophets), Isaiah, and Judges. Mark enjoys mentoring students and teaches with enthusiasm about the Old Testament and its continued relevance to the Christian life today.

As an ordained minister, Mark enjoys preaching throughout Canada and the USA. 

Dr. Boda hold the following degrees: B.Th. from Ambrose University College, Calgary, AB; M.Div. from Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, PA and Ph.D. from University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

February 12, 2013

7:00pm

Reginald Bibby

Beyond the Gods and Back: Religion's Demise and Why It Matters

Dr. Reginald Bibby, foremost sociologist of religion in Canada, argues that the contemporary Canadian religious landscape can be characterized as "polarized" - either Canadians are actively religious or they are not religious at all, reflected both in personal belief and practice and formal involvement in religious organizations. He unpacks some of the cultural explanations for why this is, discusses some of the social implications of this polarization, and offers some suggestions for churches in light of this social reality.

February 2, 2011

Meera Bai

Why I Help Addicts Shoot Up

February 9, 2011

David Fitch

The Future of Evangelicalism: Forgin a New Faithfulness in a Post Christendom North America

Part 1 - Part 2 - Chapel sermon

Dr. David Fitch, the B. R. Lindner Chair of Evangelical Theology at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL, and the founding pastor of Life on the Vine Christian Community, presented Ambrose University College’s 2011 Murray W. Downey Lectures. In the first lecture, Dr. Fitch proposed that at least three of the historical pillars of evangelical theology and practice had, over time, become devoid of their original meaning and, therefore, of their current usefulness.  In the second lecture, Dr. Fitch proposed new ways to talk about these pillars (the inerrant Bible, the decision for Christ, and the Christian nation) and highlighted the significant strengths and very real weaknesses of the trajectories of some of the Emergent/Missional leaders (Rollins, McLaren, and Hirsch) in relationship to them.

February 16 & 17, 2011

Rudy Wiebe

Where the Truth Lies: Exploring the Nature of Fact and Fiction

Part 1 - Part 2

Acclaimed author Rudy Wiebe read from his new book, "Rudy Wiebe: Collected Stories, 1955-2010," in the first recorded session.  The second recording has Mr. Wiebe giving a Public Lecture entitled, "Where the Truth Lies: Exploring the Nature of Fact and Fiction."

November 3, 2010

Tony Campolo

Social Justice: Why Bother?

Dr. Tony Campolo, a sociologist, builds a bridge between sociology and theology by asking whether Christians make Jesus a symbolic representation of themselves or whether they see Jesus as He appears in the Bible? He suggests that in many circumstances Christians do the former, reflected in how they respond to the marginalized in society. In turn, he asks people to grapple with what the world would look like if Christians took the Jesus of the Bible seriously, reflected in how they engage the "least of these" in society.

November 24, 2008

William Paul Young

The Shack

William Paul Young, author of the New York Times best-seller, The Shack, discusses his own history with Ambrose University College, his personal spiritual journey, and the purpose, message, and theology behind his highly-controversial book. The session closes with Paul’s interaction with a faculty panel and questions from the more than 1,000 in attendance.

2008