Thinking Christianly

The last couple of decades have witnessed a remarkable flurry of reflections, writings, and publications around the theme of hospitality. Many of us are indebted to Dorothy Bass and Christine Pohl and others, but especially these two, for bringing this question to the fore and helping us think about this vital Christian practice.

We need to renew afresh our commitment to hospitality—as a fundamental practice, and as a vital and essential way by which we live out our Christian identity. This is one of the great calls of Scripture. In noting this, we are reminded that the church is only truly the church when it is marked by a radical hospitality...

When we think of the practice of hospitality—and specifically the call of the church to be hospitable, both towards one another and towards the world—it is imperative that we locate this call and what this means for us within the Gospel. By this I mean the following: that few things so embody the Gospel, in...

The Scriptures assume that the Christian community is marked by hospitality, both as a posture of response to one another as Christian believers and in our response to others—to the world, say. In 1 Peter 4:9 we read, “be hospitable to one another without complaining”—or, in the NIV, “offer hospitality without grumbling.”...

As I noted in a previous blog posting, the genius of the Christian intellectual tradition is that it seeks the integration of head and heart – intellect and affect, understanding and the emotional contours of our interior lives. We are not sentimentalists, dismissive of the intellectual life; we are not rationalists...

We live and work in deeply polarized social, political and religious communities and institutions. Christians have always, of course, had to navigate substantive differences. We see witness to those towards the end of the book of Romans where the Apostle Paul is speaking to what were clearly...

Part of our vision for the Christian life, and thus for what it means to be a university, is that we diligently foster our capacity for critical confident, creative, and compassionate thinking: we cultivate the life of the mind. But unfortunately, this is not always encouraged. There are forces or movements...

We need to make the case for communities of teaching and learning that have a fundamental commitment to cultivating the life of the mind – something that is essential to the mission of the church but also to what we mean by Christian formation and discipleship. As noted, though, this commitmen...