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  • ACC 210 - 1 Managerial Accounting

    Based on the concepts learned in ACC 200, this course explores the applications of accounting information in the management context. Topics include: management planning and control, inventory and cost flow analysis, job order costing, standard costs and variance analysis, budgeting, break-even analysis, relevant costs and decision-making.

    Schedule
    Tue 6:45 PM-9:45 PM
    Location
    Online
    Semester
    Winter
  • ART 141-1 Drawing I

    An introduction to the formal and creative language of drawing with an emphasis on improving technical drawing skills and developing the ability to identify concepts related to visual perception and expression. Note: A lab fee applies to this course.

    Schedule
    May 28-June 10; M-F 5:30-9:00 PM / S 9:00 AM-4:30 PM
    Location
    A1085-1
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • BCH 297 Biochemistry

    This course will encompass the structure and function of major biomolecules, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, as well as energy transduction, enzyme mechanisms and regulation of metabolic pathways. The accompanying laboratory component will introduce some techniques commonly used in the study of biomolecules and enzymology.

    Prerequisite: BIO 131, BIO 211 and CHE 251

    Synchronous
  • BHS 400 Social Sciences Capstone

    An integrative capstone seminar based on the contributions of both sociology and psychology for understanding human behaviour. The course will integrate the method, academic content, and pragmatic application of those fields of knowledge to the social context of human behaviour and explore the ways this can lead to vocation and service in the world community. A variety of methodological, theoretical, and practical questions will be addressed.

    Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the BA: Behavioural Science (Concentration or Major) or Psychology (Major) programs in their final 15 credits of study. Permission of the department required.

    Synchronous
  • BIO 131 Introduction to the Cellular Basis of Life

    This course will cover the fundamental principles of cellular biology, including organelle structure and function, metabolism, genetics, cell division, protein synthesis, and molecular biology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

    Prerequisite: Biology 30 or Chemistry 30

    Synchronous
  • BIO 131L - 1 Introduction to the Cellular Basis of Life Lab

    This course will cover the fundamental principles of cellular biology, including organelle structure and function, metabolism, genetics, cell division, protein synthesis, and molecular biology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Prerequisite: Biology 30

    Schedule
    Tue 1:30 PM 4:30 PM
    Location
    A2151
    Semester
    Fall
  • BIO 131L - 2 Introduction to the Cellular Basis of Life Lab

    This course will cover the fundamental principles of cellular biology, including organelle structure and function, metabolism, genetics, cell division, protein synthesis, and molecular biology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Prerequisite: Biology 30

    Schedule
    Mon 3:45 PM 6:45 PM
    Location
    A2151
    Semester
    Fall
  • BIO 133 - 1 Introduction to Plant and Organismal Biology

    This course will cover the fundamental principles of cellular biology, including organelle structure and function, metabolism, genetics, cell division, protein synthesis, and molecular biology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

    Prerequisite: Biology 30 or Chemistry 30
    Synchronous
  • BIO 133 Introduction to Plant and Organismal Biology

    This course will cover the fundamental principles of cellular biology, including organelle structure and function, metabolism, genetics, cell division, protein synthesis, and molecular biology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.

    Prerequisite: Biology 30 or Chemistry 30

    Synchronous
  • BIO 211 Principles of Genetics

    This course examines the principles of heredity, Mendelian laws, as well as basic concepts of gene structure and function, gene regulation and genetic recombination. Principles from prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses will be explored. The accompanying laboratory component contains experiments and exercises to illustrate key genetic principles and genetics molecular techniques

    BIO 131
    Synchronous
  • BIO 213 Principles of Ecology

    The dynamics and maintenance of biological diversity are examined in terms of ecological processes, conservation of species, habitats, and evolutionary principles. Ecological principles and organism interactions at individual, population, community and ecosystem levels will be explored.

    Prerequisite: BIO 133

    Synchronous
  • BIO 231 Cellular and Molecular Biology

    This course examines the principles of cellular structure and function, molecular organization, regulation of cellular functions, as well as the interaction of cells with neighbouring cells and their environment.

    Prerequisite: BIO 131 and BIO 211

    Synchronous
  • BIO 241 - 1 General Microbiology

    Microbiology explores the biology of microorganisms, namely viruses, bacteria, unicellular and microscopic multicellular eukaryotes. This course will review fundamental information about the biology of these organisms and will expand this knowledge base with microbial genetics, diversity and ecology. The field of applied microbiology will also be explored in topics regarding health, industry, and the environment. The accompanying lab component will introduce a variety of lab techniques to identify microorganisms.

    Synchronous
  • BIO 269 - 1 Nutrition

    This course covers the basics of nutrition, the processing of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, vitamins and minerals, as well as discussing energy balance, fasting, and weight control.

  • BIO 320 - 1 Bioethics

    This course examines the moral concerns related to a variety of health related sciences, research programs, and medical interventions. Issues to be examined include, but are not limited to, abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering, stem cell research, reproductive technology, commodification of organs and body tissue, patient consent, and the distribution of scarce medical resources.

    Note: Bachelor of Science students may take this course for Science credit. This course is cross-listed as PH 320. Non-BSc students must take the course as PH 320.

    Course Prerequisites

    Synchronous
  • BIO 389-1 Field Course in Conservation Biology

    This 9-day course will introduce the students to several ecosystems within Costa Rica, including tropical rainforest, cloud forest, marine, and the transition zone in an active volcano zone.  Students will work with researchers at Selve Verde Rain Forest Research Station and with Park Rangers on service projects at Manuel Antonio National Park. 

    BIO 133 or permission of the department
  • BL 521 - 1 The Language of the New Testament

    This first course in New Testament Greek is designed to give students the knowledge of NT Greek that will enable them to proceed directly to courses in NT exegesis or to courses in NT Greek in which the aim is intensive and extensive reading of texts. The emphasis falls on differences between Greek and English grammar - the system of formal structural devices or "rules" which a language uses to indicate the relationships between words and arrangements of words. The student will study the grammar usually covered in a traditional first two semesters of Greek but without the memorization of vocabulary and forms. The grammatical structures are taught from "real" NT Greek as much as possible.

    Semester
    Fall
  • BL 521-CL Language of the New Testament (in Chinese)

    THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE

    This first course in New Testament Greek is designed to give students the knowledge of NT Greek that will enable them to proceed directly to courses in NT exegesis or to courses in NT Greek in which the aim is intensive and extensive reading of texts. The emphasis falls on differences between Greek and English grammar - the system of formal structural devices or "rules" which a language uses to indicate the relationships between words and arrangements of words. The student will study the grammar usually covered in a traditional first two semesters of Greek but without the memorization of vocabulary and forms. The grammatical structures are taught from "real" NT Greek as much as possible.

    Semester
    Fall
  • BL 621 - 1 Advanced Greek Exegesis

    An advanced study of Greek grammar for the purpose of gaining insight into the meaning of the New Testament text. This study will enable the student to understand a text in more detail as well as how the grammatical structures of Greek may have lent themselves to different interpretations. May be repeated for credit depending on the biblical books selected for study.

    BL 521
  • BL 622 - 1 Advanced Hebrew Exegesis (Hosea)

    An advanced study of Hebrew grammar for the purpose of gaining insight into the meaning of the Old Testament text. This study will enable the student to understand a text in more detail as well as how the grammatical structures of Hebrew may have lent themselves to different interpretations. May be repeated for credit depending on the biblical books selected for study.

    BL 622
  • BT 633 - 1 Biblical Theology of Suffering & Hope

    Suffering is experienced both individually and in communities all over the world. How does Scripture help us to understand the nature of suffering and how to respond to suffering? How is the Christian hope understood in light of suffering? This course will explore how Scripture addresses these questions. Examining the powerful message of the Old and New Testaments will demonstrate the continuing impact of the Bible's picture of suffering an d hope for the Church today, for our spiritual lives, and for the world.

    Register here.

  • BUS 100 Introduction to Business Administration

    This course provides an overview of business management and the business environment. It offers introduction to key functional areas in a business such as economic trends and business cycles, organization of business, human resources management, finance, and marketing. Emphasis is placed on how various functional areas are integrated to ensure a successful business operation.

    Synchronous
  • BUS 201 Business Communication

    This course focuses on communications in a business setting. Students will develop and strengthen their written and oral communication skills in preparation for their ongoing studies and careers. Students will also gain an understanding of the importance of communication skills in a business career. This is an experiential course where students will develop solid skills in writing, listening, problem-solving and presenting individually and within groups, both through digital and traditional media.

    Prerequisite: One of the following: BUS 100, BUS 305, DVST 305

    Synchronous
  • BUS 220 Finance

    This course examines the fundamental financial concepts including time value of money, cost of capital and capital structure, capital investment decisions, budgeting and financial planning, sources and forms of financing and business valuation.

    Prerequisite: One of the following: MA 110, MA 111, MA 149 and ACC 200

    Synchronous
  • BUS 250 Organizational Behaviour

    This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizations' characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness. It also examines the process of organizational change.

    Prerequisite: One of the following: BUS 100, BUS 305, DVST 305, PS 121

    Synchronous
  • BUS 272 Introduction to Business Analytics

    An introduction to data and business analysis. Students will explore analytical approaches for making business decisions, including basic steps in problem solving and simple modeling. In addition, they will build quantitative skills using application software that will result in more informed and effective business decision making. Communicating and presenting quantitative data and analysis graphically will also be emphasized. Instruction will consist of lecture and tutorials.

    Prerequisite: BUS 100, MA 110, STA 210 

    Synchronous
  • BUS 280 Marketing

    This course introduces the fundamental concepts and principles of marketing including topics such as analysis of customer behaviour, market segmentation and trend analysis. The 4 Ps (Product, Price, Promotion and Place) in the marketing mix will be introduced and various marketing strategies catering to different industries will also be examined by means of case studies.

    Prerequisite: One of the following: BUS 100, BUS 305, DVST 305

    Synchronous
  • BUS 372 - Data Analysis for Business

    An introduction to business analytics through the use of data analysis techniques and tools to make data-driven business decisions. Students will think critically about business problems and learn how to build basic predictive models using spreadsheet software. The focus will be on the practical use of analytical tools. Instruction will consist of lecture and tutorials.

    MA 110
    ACC 200
  • BUS 381 - Societal and Social Marketing

    This course explores both societal and social marketing. The purpose of societal marketing holds that an organization should make marketing decisions by taking into account the needs of the organization and its consumers, and in particular, the long-term interests of society. The purpose of social marketing is to influence social change such as improving health, protecting the environment, and contributing to community well-being.

    BUS 280 or BUS 305 or DVST 305
  • BUS 390 - New Ventures & Social Entrepreneurship

    This course is a study of the nature and background of entrepreneurship and the process involved from idea to opportunity to new business venture. Students are expected to study the environment in which entrepreneurship flourishes from both the perspective of the entrepreneur and of the economic system. The generation of ideas and opportunities is discussed. Students will transform an opportunity into a formal business plan. The course concludes with an examination of the process of implementation of the business plan and the management of the new business.

    30+ credits earned
    Schedule
    Wed 6:45 PM 9:45 PM
    Location
    A2131
    Semester
    Fall
  • BUS 432 Recruitment and Selection

    A key step in the human resource management (HRM) process within private, public and nonprofit sector that involves the recruitment and selection of human resources. The course provides the methods, processes, and skills to design and implement strategic recruitment and selection initiatives. Topics covered include: job analysis, legal considerations, identifying sources of applicants, screening, assessment, interviewing, and decision making.  

    BUS 330
  • BUS 445 Collaborative Leadership for Social Change

    This course is designed to introduce students first to the foundation principles and practice of servant leadership, including concepts and tools that allow the serving leader to empower and equip all stakeholders of the organization. Secondly, the course

  • BUS 445-1 Collaborative Leadership for Social Change

    This course is designed to introduce students first to the foundation principles and practice of servant leadership, including concepts and tools that allow the serving leader to empower and equip all stakeholders of the organization. 

  • BUS 492a - Entrepreneurship Incubator

    This is a two-semester entrepreneurship practicum for teams of students starting sustainable, triple bottom line-oriented companies based on business plans previously developed in BUS 392. The practicum is focused on skill development and mentoring in startup formation, resource acquisition, business and revenue model validation, project management, debt and equity financing, and written and oral presentation of startup activities.

    BUS 392
  • CC 501-CL - 1 Introduction to Counselling

    An introduction to counselling theory and skills with emphasis on pastoral care and counselling settings and a major focus is on skill development. An integration of secular and Christian approaches will be represented and critiqued with a view to implications for Christian counselling. Application will be made to specific individual and family counselling issues encountered in Christian community as well as exploring appropriate referral processes and resources. Current and traditional therapy approaches and how they can be integrated into pastoral settings will be reviewed. As well, understanding the roles, ethics, cultural differences and counsellor self-care inherent in effective pastoral counselling and care will be emphasized.

  • CC 645-CL - 1 Family Systems Theory & Therapy

    THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE

    A course in Christian counselling on a topic of current interest or specialized study. May be repeated for credit as topics change. 

    Semester
    Fall
  • CDPD 400 - Strategies for Numeracy in the Elementary Classroom

    For practicing educators, an examination of numeracy pedagogy connecting research to present day instructional practices. Students will build personal and common understandings of how children in schools engage with quantitative or spatial information to create meaning in the K-6 classroom. Instruction will build on a model of co-construction which will culminate with the development of a numeracy plan for use in their classrooms. Topics include visible numeracy practices that promote number conservation, problem-solving skills, mathematical relationships, geometrical thinking, and differentiation and assessment.

    Course Prerequisites

    Permission of the Dept
    Synchronous
  • CDPD 500 Introduction to Principles & Practices of Curriculum Design & Program Development

    Explore introductory ideas and practices for designing learning experiences for children (K-6). Students will work extensively from the Alberta Program of Studies to understand its structure the essence of each subject discipline. They will consider the variables that exist in Alberta classrooms while developing lesson plans and simple assessments that use feedback as a learning tool.

  • CDPD 600-1 - Understanding and Application of Principles & Practices of Curriculum Design & Program Development

    Building on the general principles of CDPD 500, students will use backwards design to build units of study across the various disciplines in the Alberta Program of Studies. Students will identify "big ideas" and "essential questions" in curriculum. They will make understanding and skill development visible through formative and summative assessments, create rubrics, design performance assessments, and practice reporting.

    Schedule
    Tue 1:00 PM-3:30 PM; Wed 1:30 PM-4:00 PM; Thur 12:30 PM-3:00 PM
    Location
    Tue Online; Wed RE 110 Hybrid; Thur A1085-2
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • CDPD 600-2 - Understanding and Application of Principles & Practices of Curriculum Design & Program Development

    Building on the general principles of CDPD 500, students will use backwards design to build units of study across the various disciplines in the Alberta Program of Studies. Students will identify "big ideas" and "essential questions" in curriculum. They will make understanding and skill development visible through formative and summative assessments, create rubrics, design performance assessments, and practice reporting.

    Schedule
    Tue 8:30 AM-11:00 AM; Wed 1:30 PM-4:00 PM; Thur 12:30 PM-3:00 PM
    Location
    Tues Online; Wed RE 112 Hybrid; Thur A2133
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • CH 610-OL - 1 Alliance History & Thought - Online

    A survey of the origins of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in its social, cultural, and theological contexts. The course also examines and evaluates various continuities and changes in C&MA thought and practice.

    TH 501, CH 501, or CH 610
  • CH 610-OL-1 Alliance History & Thought

    This course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Diane Quapp for further information dquapp@ambrose.edu


    A survey of the origins of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in its social, cultural, and theological contexts. The course also examines and evaluates various continuities and changes in C&MA thought and practice.

    Location
    Online
    Asynchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • CHE 101 General Chemistry I

    Focuses on the fundamental principles and concepts necessary for understanding all aspects of chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, bonding, basis of chemical reactions and intermolecular forces.

    Prerequisite: Chemistry 30

    Synchronous
  • CHE 103 General Chemistry II

    Focuses on the quantitative aspects of chemistry. Topics include chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility and electrochemistry.

    Prerequisite: Chemistry 30

    Synchronous
  • CHE 251 Organic Chemistry I

    Students apply the basic principles of chemical bonding to organic molecules, and are introduced to the concept of stereochemistry, spectroscopy and reaction mechanisms.

    Prerequisite: CHE 101 and CHE 103

    Synchronous
  • CS 620 - 1 Religion and Culture in Canada

    This course explores the relationship between religion and culture in Canada from a sociological perspective. This examination will include a look at the past, present, and potential future relationship between religion & culture in Canada.

  • CS 645 - 1 Practices of Prayer

    A course in Christian Studies on a topic of current interest or specialized study. Course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

  • CS 660 - 1 Exploring the Dream Experience

    The course will survey the significance and understanding of the dream experience in both eastern and western Christian traditions. Special attention will be given to the role of the dream in the spiritual journeys of prominent Christians, the dream and the death experience, as well as to developing a Christian approach to dream interpretation. Students will gain from the course an historical/theological appreciation for the value of the dream within a Christian worldview as well as a sense of how to integrate dream interpretation with an understanding of one's own spiritual journey. Note: Class limit of 20 students.

  • CS 661 - 1 Exploring the Desert Experience in Christian Spirituality

    An examination of the "desert/wilderness" experience in various traditions of Christian spirituality. An integrated biblical/historical/ theological/formational approach to the subject is used to assist the student in understanding the nature and purpose of the "desert/wilderness" experience in the spiritual life of the church and the individual. A special feature of the course is a one-day guided silent retreat.

  • CS 662 - 1 Prayer Paths to God

    An advanced course which studies the historical theology and practice of Christian prayer as it pertains to understanding the role of prayer within the spiritual life. The course is taught from an ecumenical perspective and includes a prayer practicum in the lectio divina (praying with scripture).

  • DVST 306-1 Basic Skills and Practice for Working with Individuals who are Vulnerable and Homeless

    The course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Shelly Sylvester for further information ssylvester@ambrose.edu


    This course will focus on basic skills and practice when working with individuals who are vulnerable and/or experiencing homelessness. It will explore the challenges faced by individuals who are vulnerable and homeless, such as lack of education and job skills, poor mental and physical health, and addictions. It will also address the importance of case management, its components, and effectiveness. The course is meant to prepare at-risk persons in this population to provide competent and client-centered help.

    Note - this class is also cross-listed as PS 306.

    PO 121, So 121, or permission of the department.
  • DVST 402-1 Human Trafficking

    This course will critically examine and contextualize the prevalent global crime of human trafficking and consider effective modes of prevention and response.  It will examine the history, roots, and development of various forms of human trafficking internationally and domestically using several frameworks. In addition, it considers a variety of responses such as addressing related social and development issues, legal responses and system reform.

    Instructor

    Schedule
    May 16-28 (M-F, T-S) 9:00 AM-12:30 PM
    Location
    A2131
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • ECOL 317 - 1 Aquatic Communities and Ecosystems

    This course will examine the major components of aquatic communities, and explore how these interact to influence ecosystem function.  Topics including production, nutrient flow, trophic interactions, and diversity will be discussed as they relate to conservation and management.

    Mandatory Lab included as well.

    BIO 213 or BIO 310
  • ED 501 - 1 Teaching and Learning

    This course uses group and experiential learning to provide participants with growing confidence in their identity as communicators in diverse teaching situations, aware of the diversities in learners and instructional methodologies relevant to Christian educational ministry. This course is also offered as: ED 501-CL Teaching and Learning (3) O (Course is offered in Chinese language) ED 501-OL Teaching and Learning (3) B (Course is offered online)

    Schedule
    Wed 6:45-9:45pm
    Location
    L2100, Hybrid
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • ED 645-CL - 1 Special Topics in Education

    THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE. A course in education, discipleship or leadership on a topic of current interest or specialized study. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

  • ELQS 001 - Becoming a Transformative Leader, Fall 2022

    Begin to develop your personal vision of leadership through guided inquiry, case studies and journalling. Reflect and question your personal beliefs about leadership through a focus on research and best practices about transformative leadership, interwoven with personal reflection and narrative.

    All other classes are fully online with optional opportunities to connect synchronously, via Zoom.

    Schedule
    Sept. 17, 2022-Dec. 3, 2022
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Fall 2022
  • ELQS 001 - Becoming a Transformative Leader, Spring 2022

    Begin to develop your personal vision of leadership through guided inquiry, case studies and journalling. Reflect and question your personal beliefs about leadership through a focus on research and best practices about transformative leadership, interwoven with personal reflection and narrative.

    All other classes are fully online with optional opportunities to connect synchronously, via Zoom.

    Schedule
    Synchronous/Zoom first class Saturday, April 16, 2022 9:30-11:00AM All other classes are fully online with optional opportunities to connect synchronously, via Zoom
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • ELQS 002 - Being a Transformative Principal Winter 2023

    Consolidate theory, your personal beliefs and contextual knowledge by focusing on instructional leadership, managing school operations, vision building and fostering effective relationships for a flourishing school culture. You will curate a personal leadership portfolio that showcases your ongoing grown as a leader.

    Fully online with optional opportunities to connect synchronously, via Zoom.

    Students who have already taken ELQS 001 and want to register for ELQS 002, please email: Registrar@ambrose.edu  You cannot register using the registration portal.

    Schedule
    Jan. 21, 2023-April 1, 2023
    Location
    Online
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter 2023
  • ELQS 002 - Being a Transformative Principal, Spring/Summer 2022

    Consolidate theory, your personal beliefs and contextual knowledge by focusing on instructional leadership, managing school operations, vision building and fostering effective relationships for a flourishing school culture. You will curate a personal leadership portfolio that showcases your ongoing grown as a leader.

    Fully online with optional opportunities to connect synchronously, via Zoom.

    Students who have already taken ELQS 001 and want to register for ELQS 002, please email: Registrar@ambrose.edu  You cannot register using the registration portal.

    Schedule
    May 24-June 27th, 2022
    Location
    Online
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • ELQS 002 Being a Transformative Principal

    Consolidate theory, your personal beliefs and contextual knowledge by focusing on instructional leadership, managing school operations, vision building and fostering effective relationships for a flourishing school culture. You will curate a personal leadership portfolio that showcases your ongoing grown as a leader.

  • EN 115 - 1 Introduction to Literature and Language

    This course introduces students to post-secondary studies in English by exploring developments in langauge, literature, and culture in and over time. Students will have the opportunities to study particular themes and compare different genre.

  • EN 130 Introduction to English Literature

    An introduction to university English studies through the exploration of poetry, fiction, drama, and the literary essay. Students will learn strategies for the close reading and analysis of texts and for writing about literature.

    Note: Students can only earn credit for one of the following: EN 115 or 130.

    Synchronous
  • EN 221 English Literature to 1800

    A foundational course in literary studies, this class provides an introduction to a wide range of literary works in English from the eighth century to the late eighteenth century. The course introduces students to the breadth of genres that comprise the English literary tradition. Significant attention will be given to critical reading skills and further development of writing skills.

    Prerequisite: 3 credits in English (Co-requisite for English major students)

    Note: Students can only earn credit for one of the following: EN 221 or EN 220a.

    Synchronous
  • EN 232 Reading Poetry

    An introductory survey of the various kinds of poetry written in English, with examples from the fourteenth to the twentieth centuries, this course develops the basic principles of formal poetic analysis through the close readings of poems.

    Prerequisite: 3 credits in English

    Note: Students can only earn credit for one of the following: EN 232 or EN 330.

    Synchronous
  • EN 245 - 1 CS Lewis, JRR Tokien, and the Inklings

    A study of the major literary works, themes, and ideas of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and their friends, the group known as the Inklings. It examines themes such as the use of myth to explore problems of modernity, the relationship between Christian faith and art, as well as the debates over literary versus popular fiction.

    EN 115
  • EN 275 - 1 Spiritual Autobiographies

    An introduction through their own writings to the spiritual pilgrimages of several significant figures in the history of the church, this course also examines many of the key problems, such as the role of memory and the relation of fact to fiction, in the autobiographical genre. Representative works include Augustine's Confessions, Bunyan's Grace Abounding, as well as writings by anonymous saints of the Orthodox tradition and a variety of contemporary autobiographies. 

  • EN 350 - 1 Shakespeare

    This course studies thoroughly Shakespeare's drama: the tragedy, romance, comedy, historical play, and problem play. Shakespeare's works are placed in the context of the history and culture of the Elizabethan era. Note: This course can fulfill a Fine Arts elective in all programs.

    6 credits in English
    Schedule
    Tue/Thu 3:15 PM 4:30 PM
    Location
    A2210
    Semester
    Fall
  • EN 380 - 1 Romanticism

    Wordsworth's and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads (1798) began the Romantic period in English literature, a period that witnessed changes to the perception of the role of the artist and art, the effects of which are still experienced today. The Romantic phenomenon continued for the next four decades; the works of the above two poets, those of Byron, P.B. Shelley, Keats, and several less well-known writers will be studied in the context of the diverse historical, social, intellectual, and artistic climate of the period.

    6 credits in English
    Schedule
    Tue/Thu 10:00 AM 11:15 AM
    Location
    A2212
    Semester
    Fall
  • EN 390 Modern Literary Theory

    This course introduces and examines the various theories of literary interpretation. We will begin the course by studying the history of modern literary theory and criticism. By examining major theoretical movements such as Deconstruction, Reader-Response, and Feminism the course aims to equip students with the tools of critical analysis.

    Prerequisite: 6 credits in English or three credits in English and HUM 201

    Synchronous
  • EN 480 - 1 Literature by Women

    Although the theories of feminism are now well rehearsed, in literary studies a good many women authors are simply not yet read by students because sourcing primary texts is often a difficult task. The most recent decades of scholarly activity, however, are now coming to fruition in that numerous overlooked and heretofore inaccessible or unavailable texts by women are now more readily obtainable. This course endeavors to survey both major and minor female authors from the late Middle Ages through to the end of the twentieth century.

    6 credits in English
  • FA 240-1 Aesthetics

    Schedule
    May 16-28 (M-F, T-S) 1:00 PM-4:30 PM
    Location
    Online
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • FE 400 - 1 Transition to Vocational Ministry

    Clarification and integration of a personal philosophy of ministry upon completion of internship, including consideration of calling, giftedness, personal health, social trends and current practices in the contemporary church. Taught each winter semester during Reading Week, as a week-long module. Note: This course cannot be taken for an Arts and Science degree. 2018 - modified module/hybrid course.

    Completion of Internship
    Schedule
    January 10-April 14: Online (asynchronous); February 22-24, 9am-4pm: Online (synchronous)
    Location
    A2133, Hybrid
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • FE 500 Introduction to the Life of Schools

    Intended for pre-service teachers to deepen and broaden their understanding of the lives of students, teachers and principals in Alberta public schools through school visits, dialogue and novice action research. The developmental focus of the seminar will be on the interconnectedness of schools and classrooms with learners, teachers, curriculum and society. Students will visit several school sites in the Calgary area as case studies for this course.

    Must be in the B Ed program
  • FE 600 - 1 An Understanding and Application of Field Experience

    Intended to deepen and broaden pre-service teachers' understanding of teaching practices in Alberta public schools. Through seminar dialogue, case study development, and novice action research rooted in their field experience, pre-service teachers will unpack instructional strategies that foster relationships with students and help identify and meet student needs in inclusive classroom environments.

    FE 500
    Schedule
    Fri 1:30 PM 3:30 PM
    Location
    Online
    Semester
    Winter
  • FE 600 - 2 An Understanding and Application of Field Experience

    Intended to deepen and broaden pre-service teachers' understanding of teaching practices in Alberta public schools. Through seminar dialogue, case study development, and novice action research rooted in their field experience, pre-service teachers will unpack instructional strategies that foster relationships with students and help identify and meet student needs in inclusive classroom environments.

    FE 500
    Schedule
    Fri 1:30 PM 3:30 PM
    Location
    Online
    Semester
    Winter
  • FMC 420-1 Walking with God

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Sep 10,17 2022 9:00am-12:30pm
    Location
    Ambrose University (Online)
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Fall 2022
    Course Language
    Mandarin
  • FMC 420-2 Walking with God

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Oct 8 2022 9:00am-2:30pm
    Location
    Ambrose University (Online)
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Fall 2022
    Course Language
    Cantonese
  • FMC 430 - Spiritual Care

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Sep 9, 24 2022 9:00am-12:30pm
    Location
    Ambrose University (Online)
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Fall 2022
    Course Language
    Mandarin
  • FMC 430-2 Spiritual Care

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Nov 5, 12 2022 9:00am-12:30pm
    Location
    Ambrose University (Online)
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Fall 2022
    Course Language
    Cantonese
  • GEOG 120 - 1 Physical Geography

    The course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Shelly Sylvester for further information ssylvester@ambrose.edu


    An introduction to the science of spatial pattern, variation, process, and interrelationship of Earth's major surface systems along with their influence on human habitat and human interdependence with the planet, including elements of atmosphere, waters, landforms, soils, and biotic communities.

  • HI 140 Themes in World History

    An introductory, thematic, global overview of human history from the ancient era to the recent past. This course examines the rise of civilizations, the development and fragmentation of empires, the modern trend towards globalization, and the many points of contact between diverse peoples. Topically, it will explore questions related to power, culture, religion, environment, and society.

    Note: Credit for HI 140 and either HI 141 and 142 will not be allowed. 

    Synchronous
  • HI 141 World History to 1500

    An introductory survey of the diverse civilizations of the world from the ancient era through the western Middle Ages and Renaissance. This course examines the rise of civilization, the development of empires, and points of contact between civilizations in Mesopotamia, India, China, the Mediterranean, Africa, and the Americas.

  • HI 142 World History since 1500

    An introductory survey of the diverse civilizations of the world from the western "Age of Discovery" to the present. This course examines the growing consciousness in the western world of the nature of non-western civilizations, the modern growth of European domination over the globe, and the recent trend toward globalization. Spring 2018: May 7-18 Monday to Friday 9 am to 12:30 pm

  • HI 200 Canada Since Confederation

    A survey of the history of Canada since Confederation, considering social, cultural, environmental, economic, political, and constitutional developments between the 1860s and the 2000s, encompassing settler communities, Canada’s indigenous peoples, and new Canadians.

    Synchronous
  • HI 225 - 1 Modern Revolutions

    An examination of political revolutions-primarily in the Western world-from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Topics include the American and French Revolutions, the struggle for representative constitutional government in the nineteenth century, the development of modern political ideologies, the emergence of political terrorism, and the rise of twentieth-century totalitarian movements.

    3 credits in history
  • HI 263 History of Christianity

    An introduction to the global history of Christianity, with emphasis on the social and cultural context in which Christian beliefs, practices, and institutions developed.

    Synchronous
  • HI 280 History in Practice

    An introduction to the nature, methods, and practice of history. Topics will include the nature of history as a discipline; historical sources and their analysis; library, archival, and Internet research; historical interpretation; and historical writing.

    Prerequisite: 3 credits in History

    Synchronous
  • HI 321 - 1 Vikings, Anglo-Saxons, and the Medieval North

    A study of the history and archaeology of Northern Europe, the British Isles, and the North Atlantic during the early Middle Ages, from the end of Roman Britain to the Christianization of Scandinavia. Topics will include ethnic identities and cross-cultural influences, warfare and political structures, and the role of the North in the political and economic development of medieval Europe.

    3 credits in history
  • HI 323 The Protestant Reformation

    An investigation of the transition from medieval to modern Christianity through the events of the Protestant Reformation. Attention will be given to the contexts of the Renaissance, the German and Swiss Reformation movements, and the diverse expressions of sixteenth-century Christianity throughout Europe.

  • HI 362-OL - 1 Alliance History & Thought

    This course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Diane Quapp for further information dquapp@ambrose.edu


    A survey of the origins of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in its social, cultural, and theological contexts. The course also examines and evaluates various continuities and changes in C&MA thought and practice.

    Note: This course is crosslisted as REL 362 and crossleveled as CH 610 and TH 640.

    This course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Diane Quapp for further information dquapp@ambrose.edu A survey of the origins of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in its social, cultural, and theological contexts. The course also examines and evaluates various continuities and changes in C&MA thought and practice. Note: This course is crosslisted as REL 362 and crossleveled as CH 610 and TH 640.
    Location
    Online
    Semester
    Winter
  • HI 362-OL-1 Alliance History & Thought

    A survey of the origins of The Christian and Missionary Alliance in its social, cultural, and theological contexts. The course also examines and evaluates various continuities and changes in C&MA thought and practice. The online class has a limit of 20 students and preference is given to those who live outside of Calgary.

    Schedule
    regular winter semester - January 10 - April 14, 2022 @ TBD
    Location
    Online
    Asynchronous
    Semester
    Winter
    Course Language
    English
  • HI 370 Public History

    A seminar course studying the ways in which history is put to “public” use. Attention will focus on ways representations of the past are marshalled to create and reproduce “usable” meanings and how these meanings have come into conflict. Students will also be involved in a public history project applying their skills and knowledge in a community-based research initiative.

    Prerequisite: 3 credits in History

    Synchronous
  • HI 432 - 1 Fall of Rome & the Collapse of Complex Societies

    A seminar course examining historical and anthropological scholarship on how and why some societies collapse. The course focuses on the collapse of political and economic complexity in the Western Roman Empire-the so-called "Fall of Rome" (4th-6th centuries A.D.)-but also compares other collapses across history, from the cities of the Maya to the shores of Rapa Nui/Easter Island.

    3 credits in History 300+
  • ICS 202 - Cultural Anthropology

    Introduction to cultural anthropology including the concepts of culture, language, status and role, marriage and the family, kinship, legal systems, social groups. Students learn about participant-observation methods using cultural locations in and around Calgary.

    Synchronous
  • ICS 205 - Intercultural Competence

    Foundational principles and necessary skills for effective communication between people based on an understanding of culture and worldview. Attention will be given to the impact of culture on the shaping of worldview, communication, thinking, values and verbal and non-verbal behaviour and the important role of social, cultural and historical contexts in human interactions.

    Synchronous
  • ICS 303 - 1 Global Forms of Violence Against Women

    A study of theoretical frameworks that undergird violence against women in Majority World and Western societies including: Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), infanticide, female foeticide, honour-killings, early child-marriage, prostitution, and Gender Based Violence (GBV). Particular attention will be given to the ways in which Christianity has been used as both a weapon and instrument of grace in responding to violence against women.

    REL 105 or REL 161
  • ICS 404 - 1 Intercultural Studies Travel Study

    Travel study provides experiential learning about issues in intercultural studies. Preparatory reading and post-travel written assignments are required. The location will depend on the expertise of the instructor.

    Permission of the Department
  • KIN 335 Sports Injuries and Rehabilitation

    The course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Shelly Sylvester for further information ssylvester@ambrose.edu


    This course will be a combination of lectures, directed study, and practical wk. It can be completed over 1 term or 2. Lectures will include topics such as the physiology of sports injuries, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and training methods.  Directed study will enhance these topics and include the most up-to-date research in these areas. Hands-on practical work and tutorials will include training methods and injury rehabilitation (e.g. taping methods and rehabilitative exercises, etc.)

    Mandatory tutorial is included as well

    KIN 201
  • KIN 385 - 1 Biomechanics

    This course will cover the biomechanical properties of tissues and organs and will discuss the effects of these properties on function. Methods for the analysis of deformational mechanics will be introduced as they apply to biological tissues including bone, muscle, and connective tissues. Analysis of movement will also be discussed at a biomechanical level. PHY 111 Recommended for Pre-Requisite. ZOO 261 and ZOO 263 are required.

    ZOO 261
    Schedule
    Tue/Thu 10:00 AM-11:15 AM
    Location
    N/A
    Semester
    Winter
  • LE 503-OL - 1 Leadership & Leadership Formation

    An exploration, analysis, and application of the field of leadership and personal leadership formation as it relates to ministry and marketplace environments. The goal is the shaping of skills in adaptive leadership placed around the core issue of character development. (This is taught online.) 

  • LE 545 Life of David

    David was a man after God’s own heart. He was also utterly human and deeply awed - wise, courageous compassionate, but also prone to anger, lust, fear, and more. He’s not so much a model as a mirror. Though much about him inspires us, not everything invites our admiration or imitation. But everything - his character, his prayers, his relationships, his decisions, his actions, his mistakes - demands our full attention and prayerful reflection. We will explore the David story, not to find “leadership principles” but to reflect on the life of a real man and leader in real time, seeking wisdom for our own life and time.

    This workshop is also available by livestream for non-Calgary residents.

  • LE 545-1 Vital Signs of Organizational Health

    Based on Dr. Smith’s book Institutional Intelligence, this workshop will help church and non-profit leaders think and act effectively when it comes to the organizational side of their work. The particular focus will be institutional intelligence around three key areas of organizational effectiveness: mission clarity; governance structures that work; and a dynamic institutional culture. Each is essential to the effective functioning of a church or a non-profit; each is a critical point of leverage for the leader of a church or non-profit. 

  • LE 545-2 The Challenge of Change

    An exploration of how to wisely and effectively make our way through change in an organization or congregation. We will examine the challenge of change and the critical postures and moves of wise change leaders.

  • LE 633-OL - 1 Leadership & Resilience

    A study of the biblical call to endurance in life and service, complemented by an examination of contemporary research on resilience. A variety of case studies will be explored and analyzed prompting students to create a personal resilience strengthening strategy.

    Register as an Open Studies student here

  • LE 635 - 1 Leadership in Times of Rolling Crisis

    An exploration of how to face the dilemma of multiple crises and then applying the skills inherent in crisis readiness, crisis management, and crisis resiliency. Students will master the model of secure base leadership - a way of building influence by providing a sense of protection and caring while also providing a source of inspiration that produces energy, exploration, and growth in times of great challenge.

  • LTA 500 Introduction to Principles & Applied of Learning Theory

    An introduction to foundational theories of learning, drawn from cognitive and behavioural sciences, and their application to educational practices. In the first of three courses in the Learning Theory and Application stream, preservice teachers will learn how to design engaging learning experiences, creating conditions so that diverse learners can maximize their learning. The course participants will examine the relationships between learning and children's growth and development, human behavior and assessment practices in elementary schools.

    Must be in the B Ed program
  • MI 501 - 1 Personal & Corporate Outreach

    This course seeks to integrate evangelism and evangelistic practice with the purpose of developing a wholesome biblical lifestyle conducive to personal and community outreach. Participants will be encouraged to improve their effectiveness in personal communication of the Gospel. Skills and techniques will be learned to enhance the participant's style of communicating the Gospel. Principles and approaches for developing disciples will be explored in an effort to help new believers as they are incorporated into a local fellowship.

    Semester
    Fall
  • MI 501-OL - 1 Personal & Corporate Outreach

    This course seeks to integrate evangelism and evangelistic practice with the purpose of developing a wholesome biblical lifestyle conducive to personal and community outreach. Participants will be encouraged to improve their effectiveness in personal communication of the Gospel. Skills and techniques will be learned to enhance the participant's style of communicating the Gospel. Principles and approaches for developing disciples will be explored in an effort to help new believers as they are incorporated into a local fellowship.

  • MI 502 - 1 Intercultural Competence

    This course is designed to equip individuals to become more intentional about engaging in intercultural interactions. In the ongoing quest to value "others" and their "oneness," worldview differences are explored and habits for assessing and reengineering long held values are examined. Approaches for adjusting to and working with individuals with different cultural perspectives are investigated. Since effective interaction with others requires the development of new skills, participants will explore basic elements related to effective intercultural communication both from a theoretical and practical perspective. Techniques for managing differences, resolving conflicts and applying problem solving in various contexts will be analyzed.

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Jan 14-15, Feb 11-12, Mar 18-19; F 6:30-9:30pm, S 9:00am-4:00pm
    Location
    A2133
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • MI 502-CL - 1 Intercultural Competence

    'THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE

    This course is designed to equip individuals to become more intentional about engaging in intercultural interactions. In the ongoing quest to value "others" and their "oneness", worldview differences are explored & habits for assessing & reengineering long-held values are examined. Approaches for adjusting to and working with individuals with different cultural perspectives are investigated. Since effective interaction with others requires the development of new skills, participants will explore basic elements related to effective intercultural communication both from a theoretical & practical perspective. Techniques for managing differences, resolving conflicts, and applying problem-solving in various context will be analyzed.

    Semester
    Fall
  • MI 502-CL - 1 Intercultural Competence (Chinese)

    This course is designed to equip individuals to become more intentional about engaging in intercultural interactions. In the ongoing quest to value "others" and their "oneness," worldview differences are explored and habits for assessing and reengineering long held values are examined. Approaches for adjusting to and working with individuals with different cultural perspectives are investigated. Since effective interaction with others requires the development of new skills, participants will explore basic elements related to effective intercultural communication both from a theoretical and practical perspective. Techniques for managing differences, resolving conflicts and applying problem solving in various contexts will be analyzed.

    Schedule
    Feb 2-5, 9-12; W-F 6:00-9:00pm, S 9:00am-4:00pm
    Location
    Online
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • MI 502-OL - 1 Intercultural Competence

    This course is designed to equip individuals to become more intentional about engaging in intercultural interactions. In the ongoing quest to value "others" and their "oneness," worldview differences are explored and habits for assessing and reengineering long held values are examined. Approaches for adjusting to and working with individuals with different cultural perspectives are investigated. Since effective interaction with others requires the development of new skills, participants will explore basic elements related to effective intercultural communication both from a theoretical and practical perspective. Techniques for managing differences, resolving conflicts and applying problem solving in various contexts will be analyzed. This is an online course.

  • MI 503 - 1 Missions in Global Perspective

    Theological, strategic and personal issues related to the contemporary expression of Christian missions are surveyed and examined in this course. It seeks to foster an understanding of the biblical basis and Christian motivation for mission, examine critical insights into forms and functions of various mission strategies, while introducing key issues facing the Christian missionary enterprise. Participants will be encouraged to examine their potential role in the mission of the church. This course is taught in Chinese. 

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Wed 3:00-6:00 pm
    Location
    L2100
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • MI 503-CL - 1 Missions in Global Perspective

    THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE Theological, strategic and personal issues related to the contemporary expression of Christian missions are surveyed and examined in this course. It seeks to foster an understanding of the biblical basis and Christian motivation for mission, examine critical insights into forms and functions of various mission strategies, while introducing key issues facing the Christian missionary enterprise. Participants will be encouraged to examine their potential role in the mission of the church. This course is taught in Chinese. 

  • MI 503-CL - 1 Missions in Global Perspective (Chinese)

    Theological, strategic and personal issues related to the contemporary expression of Christian missions are surveyed and examined in this course. It seeks to foster an understanding of the biblical basis and Christian motivation for mission, examine critical insights into forms and functions of various mission strategies, while introducing key issues facing the Christian missionary enterprise. Participants will be encouraged to examine their potential role in the mission of the church. This course is taught in Chinese. 

    Schedule
    Feb 16-19, Mar 30-Apr 2; W-F 6:30-9:30pm, S 9:00am-5:00pm
    Location
    A2212, Hybrid
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • MI 504-1 Kairos: God, the Church and the World

    Kairos is an interactive module course provided by the Christian and Missionary Alliance that focuses on the biblical, historical, strategic, and cultural dimensions of God’s mission. The Directed Study adds readings and assignments so that this teaching module can be taken for seminary credit.

    Offered annually.

  • MI 511 Cultural Anthropology for Intercultural Mission

    This course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Diane Quapp for further information dquapp@ambrose.edu


    An introduction to the insights of cultural anthropology for intercultural ministry. The course includes theories of culture and societies, religion and worldview, kinship and family structure, communication theory and the dynamics of change. Participants are encouraged to explore models useful in ministering to specific societies and cultures.

    This course is cross-levelled with ICS 202

  • MI 613 - 1 Third Millennium Trends & Issues in Missions

    The world around us has become a dazzling kaleidoscope of humanity. This course will address the growing needs for leadership development and training both within Canada and foreign settings to minister with intelligence and sensitivity to intercultural communities.

    MI 502
  • MI 645 - 1 Global Forms of Violence Against Women

    A study of theoretical frameworks that undergird violence against women in Majority World and Western societies including: Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), infanticide, female foeticide, honour-killings, early child-marriage, prostitution, and Gender Based Violence (GBV). Particular attention will be given to the ways in which Christianity has been used as both a weapon and instrument of grace in responding to violence against women.

  • MI 705 - 1 Mentoring for Intercultural Effectiveness

    This seminar style course integrates formal and non-formal learning experiences to intentionally prepare kingdom learners for a wide range of intercultural opportunities. This mentor-based, character-oriented learning experience encourages participants to develop a theological framework for understanding themes such as vocational direction, tolerance for risk and intercultural sensitivity. Working with an IM faculty member and a local mentor, learners will explore a wide range of issues that stem from the lived experience of their mentors. Corequisite: Normally taken in conjunction with MI 712 Intercultural Internship, or MI 720 Intercultural Ministry Coaching.

    Permission of the Department
  • MI 720 - 1 Intercultural Ministry Coaching

    This course is designed as an alternative to Intercultural Internship for those who have ministry experience, who are presently or recently in full or significant part-time intercultural ministry. The course expects the student to be actively involved in a guided mentoring relationship with a colleague in ministry. This relationship will involve intentional theological reflection on ministry and mutual accountability. The student will engage in self and peer evaluation. Prerequisites: Please refer to "Internship Program" section of the Academic Calendar for a list of the course prerequisites and program requirements.

    Permission of the Department
  • MU 016-1 Rudiments of Music Theory

    This introductory 6-lesson directed study in basic music theory prepares students for future studies in the elements of Western art music. Course components include music notation, scales, intervals, key signatures, time signatures, chords, cadences, and rudimentary concepts of harmony and analysis.

    Non-credit

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department

    Schedule
    TBD
    Location
    TBD
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • MU 036-1 Introduction to Music Theory

    This introductory 12-lesson directed study in basic music theory prepares students for future studies in the elements of Western art music. Course components include music notation, scales, intervals, key signatures, time signatures, chords, cadences, and rudimentary concepts of harmony and analysis.

    Non-credit

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department

    Schedule
    TBD
    Location
    TBD
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • MU 100 Introduction to Music

    The course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Shelly Sylvester for further information ssylvester@ambrose.edu


    An introductory survey of the history, genres, and composers of Western art music from the medieval era to the present. This course includes the study of musical vocabulary, musical elements, and the development of musical style in its cultural contexts.

  • MU 126 - 1 Musical Structures 1

    An introduction to the elements of Western art music and their notation with application to the design of musical lines and texture. Prerequisites: Grade Two RCM Rudiments Theory or equivalent

    RCM Advanced Rudiments or equivalent
    Semester
    Fall
  • MU 157/257/357/457-2 Jazz Ensemble II

    Two jazz ensembles, one jazz band, the Ambrose orchestra, or String Ensemble. In addition to the requirements of the first two terms of an ensemble, students are required to participate concurrently in a large vocal ensemble for two terms. No additional credit will be given or additional fees assessed.

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Mon 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Location
    G2195
    Semester
    Winter
  • MU 211 History of Music III

    A general survey of the genres, performance practices, composers, performers and cultural context of Western art music from the Romantic period to the present.

    Prerequisite: MU 207 or permission of the Department.

    MU 207 or permission of the department
    Synchronous
  • MU 399 Music Therapy

    This introduction course provides an overview on how music therapy is used to address clinical needs of children and adults affected by mental health disorders. Topics will include: a history of music therapy, key approaches and current perspectives in the field, using music as a self-reflective practice, benefits of music for self-care. An experiential component will introduce active and receptive music based interventions. Lectures will outline clinical examples and vignettes from recent music therapy literature. Current research into music therapy and mental health will be examined. This course is open to anyone interested in learning more about the work that music therapists.  Students will be able to explore in theory and practice the effects of music on mental, physical and emotional.

    Note: This course is crosslisted as PS 399.

  • MU 401 - 1 Psychology of Music

    This course reviews important recent advancement in the interdisciplinary subject of psychology of music. It examines our current understanding on the role of human mental and brain functions in musical activities. Topics to be explored include the origins of music, the nature of sound and music, music perception, cognition and emotion, music acquisition and performance, the creative process of composing music, and the relationship of musical engagement and development of other intellectual abilities. Prerequisites: 3 PS credits at the 300-level or 3 PS credits and permission of the Department.

    3 Credits in Psychology at the 300 level
  • MU 426 - 1 Advanced Theory and Form

    A study of Chromatic harmony, augmented sixth chords, and chords of the ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth. The course will examine and analyze the forms of Impressionism and the late 19th century as well as forms and influences from the 20th century and beyond. Finale music notation program will be used.

    MU 326
  • MU 427 - 1 Composition II Arranging and Composition

    An advanced applied theory course which allows students to expand their music theory and composition skills, with significant emphasis on arranging of pre-existing materials, original composition, and orchestration for a variety of ensembles. Both choral/vocal and instrumental genres will be explored. Finale music notation program will be used.

    MU 426
    Semester
    Fall
  • MU 485 Music Capstone Seminar

    A culminating course in which students integrate knowledge from their degree and apply that knowledge to preparative tasks related to their future careers. Students will engage with themes related to music, faith, and society; undertake reflections on personal formation and vocational calling; and complete a final professional career portfolio.

    Prerequisite: Completion of 75 credits (4 year Bachelor of Music or Bachelor of Arts: Music Major) or 60 credits (3 year Bachelor of Arts: Music Concentration).

    Synchronous
  • NT 502-1 Synoptic Gospels

    An introduction to New Testament studies and exegetical skills through the study of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke.

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Friday 8:15-11:00 am
    Location
    RE 110, Hybrid
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • NT 502-OL - 1 Synoptic Gospels

    An introduction to New Testament studies and exegetical skills through the study of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke .

  • NT 606-CL - 1 Romans

    THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE

    This course explores the life, ministry, and theology of Paul as it comes to expression in his letters to the Romans and Galatians. By means of expositional analysis, particular attention is given to Paul's Gospel, his theology of God, the cross, the law-free Gospel, the Holy Spirit, and ethics. Students develop skills in exegesis and capacity to critique theological systems commonly used to interpret Romans. 

    NT 502 or OT 502
    Semester
    Fall
  • NT 608 - CL - 1 The Prison Epistles

    An exploration of Paul's theology as it comes to expression in Philippians, Ephesians, Colossians, and Philemon. Attention is given to the historical, argumentative, and literary contexts of each letter. Particular attention is given to Paul's theology.

    Schedule
    April 9 to 11, 23 to 25 2021 Fridays 6:00 pm to 9:30 pm, Saturdays 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Sundays 12:30 pm to 5:00 pm
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • NT 645 - 1 The Gospel of John in Christian Theology

    An examination of the initial reception of the Gospel of John and the memories of the author by ‘the School of John’ (J.B. Lightfoot) during the second century, bringing this work into dialogue with a close reading of the gospel as a ‘Paschal’ (Easter) Gospel and the reading of French Phenomenologist Michel Henry. By bringing together these readers of the Gospel of the Theologian (as he was known in antiquity), this course will consider the nature and discourse of Christian theology.

    3 Credits of Biblical Studies
    Semester
    Fall
  • NT 720 - 1 Advanced Reading: Concentration

    A comprehensive study of enduring and recent issues in the study of the New Testament as well as mastery of set Greek biblical texts. This course is a supervised study and prepares students for the New Testament Concentration comprehensive exam in the Master in Theological Studies program. Note: This course is conducted as an individual Directed Study, requiring permission of the Registrar, Dean and instructor.

  • OT 502-CL - 1 Pentateuch (in Mandarin)

    THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE

    An introduction to Old Testament studies and exegetical skills through the study of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy.

  • OT 502-OL - 1 Pentateuch

    An introduction to Old Testament studies and exegetical skills through the study of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. (This class is taught online.) 

  • OT 710-CL - 1 Advanced Biblical Study in Hebrew: Proverbs

    'THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN CHINESE LANGUAGE This study of an Old Testament book based on the Hebrew text provides an opportunity for the student to practice the integration of Hebrew language study and exegesis with an intensive study of a selected biblical book. The book selected varies each semester. Course may be repeated for credit as the books under consideration change.

    BL 512
  • Permission of the Department

    Permission of departments may be required to take some courses. Please check with the heads of the departments for more information about their permission requirements.

  • PH 125 - 2 Introduction to Philosophy

    An introduction to philosophy through discussion of topics such as the criteria and limits of human knowledge, the mind/body problem, free will and determinism, the existence and nature of God, and ethics.

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Wed/Fri 8:15 AM 9:30 AM
    Location
    A2131
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • PH 125 Introduction to Philosophy

    An introduction to philosophy through discussion of topics such as the criteria and limits of human knowledge, the mind/body problem, free will and determinism, the existence and nature of God, and ethics.

    Synchronous
  • PH 240-1 Aesthetics

    Schedule
    May 16-28 (M-F, T-S) 1:00 PM-4:30 PM
    Location
    Online
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • PR 501-OL Between 2 Worlds: Scripture for Preaching and Teaching

    An exploration of the principles and practices for navigating between the text of scripture and the world we live in. Students will take away theological insights, practical tools, and fresh inspiration for faithfully reading scripture and communicating its meaning and content effectively in their own setting.

    OT 502 or NT 502
  • PR 545 Preaching and Storytelling

    In an era of profound story telling preaching can seem culturally obsolete. The strength of great preaching goes beyond exegesis. To be effective, story-telling is essential. In fact, in the business world story-telling is touted as the premier communication skill. This course will teach both the art and craft of engaged preaching by tying biblical text to story, and vice-versa.

    This workshop is also available by livestream for non-Calgary residents.

  • PR 545 Preaching as Performative Art

    Dispelling performance myths about the preaching arts and relieving performance fears (or helping you to preach through them), this workshop introduces a number of traditional acting techniques to help preachers effectively communicate their messages. Beginning with a discussion that defines the differences and similarities between acting and preaching, the course will help identify key areas in which preachers often habitually and unintentionally sabotage their own ability to communicate. Participants will be led through lectures and a series of hands-on exercises designed to help them understand how they can use their instrument (body, voice, mind, emotions) to reach their listeners. Learners should wear comfortable clothes that one can move in and bring along a short excerpt (2-3 minutes) of a sermon to share with the class.

  • PR 545 – Preaching Science: How to Write Sermons Based on Creation Texts

    (like DNA repair mechanisms, vaccines, river hydrology, neurons, knees and the plant science of trees). This hands-on workshop will give you the theological and homiletic tools for unpacking and preaching God’s revelation through creation (alongside and through the scriptures of course!). Over the past decade John Van Sloten has been awarded several John Templeton Foundation subgrants to explore the intersection of faith and science in the context of preaching.

    Synchronous
  • PR 545-2 Preaching the Year

    This seminar will equip participants in understanding the historical patterns and significant ministry benefits of planning out a year of preaching, as well as guiding participants through the practical and spiritual discernment process of laying out each weekend for that year. We will consider how the Church Year and Cultural Year can form and enhance how we preach and disciple, what some of the different models are for laying out a year, and how annual sermon planning can be used to lift other ministries within the church body.

  • PR 610 - 1 Expository Preaching

    This course develops skills of "bridging" from biblical exegesis to expository preaching. Students will learn deductive and inductive methods of sermon-making. Consideration is also given to the basic principles that guide the effective delivery of the sermon. Opportunities are provided for each student to practice the principles and skills taught. This course is also offered as: PR 701-CL Expository Preaching (3) O (Course offered in Chinese language) Prerequeisite: PR 601 Interpreting Scripture for Preaching and Teaching. OR BL 511 Language of the Old Testament AND BL 512 Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis, OR BL 52 Language of the New Testament AND BL 522 Introduction to Greek Exegesis.

    PR 501
    Semester
    Fall
  • PR 645 Preaching & Story

    This course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Diane Quapp for further information dquapp@ambrose.edu


    In an era of profound story telling does preaching seem culturally obsolete? This course explores ways to effectively communicate the overarching biblical story with folks in the real world.  This course will teach both the art and craft of engaged preaching for today.

  • PS 121 Introduction to Psychology

    An introductory course exploring the nature and process of the human mind and behaviour. A survey of psychological research, physiological processes, basic principles of learning, memory, thinking, language, and intelligence, life-span development issues, personality, psychological disorders and related therapy, and social psychology. 

    Synchronous
  • PS 220 Child Development

    An exploration of the nature and process of normal child development as it progresses from conception to late childhood. Child development is examined as it occurs within four important areas - physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and social.

    PS 121
    Semester
    Fall
  • PS 230 Adolescent Development

    This course focuses on normal human development as it occurs during adolescence. It looks at development by way of the physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional contexts, as well as giving special attention to prevalence, prevention, and treatment of several issues of concern most common during adolescence.

    Prerequisite: PS 121

    Synchronous
  • PS 250 Social Psychology

    This course seeks to understand the nature and causes of individual behaviour in social situations, for the purpose of finding ways to improve the quality of life in society. Students will explore issues such as social perception and cognition, attitude formation, prejudice and discrimination, interpersonal attraction, altruism, aggression, group behaviour, and environmental and organizational psychology.

    Prerequisite: PS 121

    Course Prerequisites

    Synchronous
  • PS 285 - 1 Abnormal Psychology

    This course provides an introduction to psychopathology and abnormal behavior. Using a bio-psycho-social etiological framework, attention is given to the classification, assessment, and methods of therapy related to the major areas of psychopathology. A focus is also to understand the importance of prevention and education in the field of mental health.

    Synchronous
  • PS 300 Personality

    An examination of personality structure, dynamics and development, emphasizing major theoretical perspectives and methods of research. Attention will be given to the comparative anaylsis of the major theoretical models.

    Prerequisite: 3 credits in Psychology at the 200-level

    3 credits in Psychology at the 200-level
    Synchronous
  • PS 306-1 Basic Skills and Practice for Working with Individuals who are vulnerable and Homeless

    The course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Shelly Sylvester for further information ssylvester@ambrose.edu


    This course will focus on basic skills and practice when working with individuals who are vulnerable and/or experiencing homelessness. It will explore the challenges faced by individuals who are vulnerable and homeless, such as lack of education and job skills, poor mental and physical health, and addictions. It will also address the importance of case management, its components, and effectiveness. The course is meant to prepare at-risk persons in this population to prvide competent and client-centered help.

    PS 121 or SO 121 or permission of the department
  • PS 330 - 1 Brain and Behaviour

    An introduction to the neural basis of learning, memory, language, thought, motivation, emotion and behaviour. Prerequisite: 3 credits in Psychology at the 200 level BHS students may not use this class (which is cross-listed as BIO 330) to fulfill a Science requirement.

    3 credits in Psychology at the 200 level

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Wed/Fri 1:30 PM 2:45 PM
    Location
    L2100
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • PS 332 - 1 Psychology of Creativity

    Human creativity generates ideas and products that are novel and valued by the society. Creativity requires both expert knowledge in various subject domains and uninhibited problem-solving power from creative individuals to creative groups and organizations. This course offers students an opportunity to learn about current scientific research and theories on creativity and its process from a bio-psychosocial perspective; recognize and assess creative ability; identify factors and tools to help promote creative thinking and understand the importance of creating and providing supportive environments to nourish creative behaviors in various social settings.

    PS 121
  • PS 334-1 Sports Psychology

    Schedule
    May 16-20 (M-F) 9:00 am-4:00 pm
    Location
    M-T: Online; W-F: A2133
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Spring/Summer
  • PS 350 Social Psychology

    This course seeks to understand the nature and causes of individual behaviour in social situations, for the purpose of finding ways to improve the quality of life in society. Students will explore issues such as social perception and cognition, attitude formation, prejudice and discrimination, inter- personal attraction, altruism, aggression, group behaviour, and environmental and organizational psychology.

    Prerequisite: PS 121

    Synchronous
  • PS 399 Music Therapy

    This introduction course provides an overview on how music therapy is used to address clinical needs of children and adults affected by mental health disorders. Topics will include: a history of music therapy, key approaches and current perspectives in the field, using music as a self-reflective practice, benefits of music for self-care. An experiential component will introduce active and receptive music based interventions. Lectures will outline clinical examples and vignettes from recent music therapy literature. Current research into music therapy and mental health will be examined. This course is open to anyone interested in learning more about the work that music therapists.  Students will be able to explore in theory and practice the effects of music on mental, physical and emotional.

    Note: This course is crosslisted as MU 399.

  • PS 401 - 1 Psychology of Music

    This course reviews important recent advancement in the interdisciplinary subject of psychology of music. It examines our current understanding on the role of human mental and brain functions in musical activities. Topics to be explored include the origins of music, the nature of sound and music, music perception, cognition and emotion, music acquisition and performance, the creative process of composing music, and the relationship of musical engagement and development of other intellectual abilities. Prerequisites: 3 PS credits at the 300 level OR 3 cr in PS and permission of the dept.

    3 credits in psychology at the 300 level
  • PS 403 Human Sexuality

    The course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Shelly Sylvester for further information ssylvester@ambrose.edu


    Exploration of the nature of human sexuality and related research.  Gender, attraction, love, relationships, behavioural patterns and disorders will be explored from biopsychosocial and theological standpoints.  The class will emphasize considerations of diversity, development of critical thinking, responsible decicision-making, and sexual health. Lectures will include discussion and activities that are connected to the readings from the course text and assigned readings.

  • PS 405 Positive Psychology and Human Flourishing

    This course provides an introduction to the history and philosophical foundations of Positive Psychology and its interface with the current theory and practice paradigms embracing the concepts of Human Flourishing and Well-Being.  Exploration of the paradigm shift from the medical model to strengths-based practice, applications of positive psychology, role of happiness and positive mental health, and applied practice frameworks of human flourishing will be explored from both psychological and theological standpoints while also considering the impact of culture and development pursuit of well-being across the lifespan. The focus of the course is the various ways in which psychology, medical science and theology interact and inform the study and applied practice of positive psychology, positive mental health and actualization of human flourishing.  The class will emphasize self-determination, narrative pathways towards self-actualization, role of personal, environmental and performance strengths, the brain science of positive change/learning, resilience theory and growth mindset, role of risk and life challenges and future directions and expressions of human flourishing. Lectures will include discussion and activities that are connected to the readings from the course text and assigned readings.

  • PST 101 Pastoral Communications

    An introduction to written and oral communications for pastoral work (e.g., writing business letters, grant proposals, church bulletins, reports, social media, introductions).

    Semester
    Fall
  • PST 161 - Introduction to Mission

    This course begins by establishing the foundation for mission: God is a missionary God. From that premise we will see how God has worked through human beings throughout history and from this gain a perspective of what God is doing in the world today. From this historical and contemporary overview we will consider God's call on our lives. Regardless of whether or not we travel to foreign cultures, or encounter diverse cultures in our society, we are all called to be witnesses for Christ.

  • PST 201 - 1 Pastoral Counselling

    An introductory study of basic counselling skills and their application to personal problem solving in the local church context.

    PS 121

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Thurs 6:45 PM 9:30 PM
    Location
    Online
    Semester
    Winter
  • PST 204 - 1 Teaching & Learning for Discipleship

    Fundamental principles of teaching and learning with special emphasis on the application of those principles to the role of pastor/teacher within the local church context. Learners will be introduced to a variety of learning and teaching perspectives/models and then guided in the consideration of how these may be integrated into the various ministries of the local church.

    Semester
    Fall
  • PST 206 - Christian Spirituality for Mission

    An exploration of key spiritual issues people face in cross-cultural contexts (e.g., principles and practices of calling, contextualization, risk-taking, spiritual warfare, singleness, marriage, and family, and team dynamics).

    REL 111
    PST 161
  • PST 212 - Pastoral Theology

    An examination of pastoral practices such as baptism, child dedication, funerals, communion, weddings, prayers for the sick and public prayers. Students will consider these practices in light of their own theological convictions to develop a philosophy of ministry.

    Prerequisite: REL 161

    Note: Students can only earn credit for one of the following: PST 212 or PST 302

    Synchronous
  • PST 261 - 1 Missional Encounters

    The aim of this course is to understand "folk beliefs" rather than the theoretical doctrine of different world religions. Depending on where the instructor has served, the course will have a different emphasis both regarding religion and the geographical area. The focus will be on how to build bridges for the Gospel in a particular part of the world but the student will gain principles that apply in any context.

    PST 161
  • PST 262 Kairos: God, the Church, and the World

    The course will not be meeting on campus, but the synchronous times/days of this course will continue. Please contact Shelly Sylvester for further information ssylvester@ambrose.edu


    Kairos is an interactive module course provided by the Christian and Missionary Alliance that focuses on the biblical, historical, strategic, and cultural dimensions of God’s mission.  The Directed Study adds readings and assignments so that this teaching module can be taken for undergraduate credit. 

    Offered annually

  • PST 301 - Homiletics

    Principles of constructing and delivering expository sermons. Students will preach in class for evaluation by instructor and peers.

    Prerequisite: REL 315

    Synchronous
  • PST 301L - 2 Homiletics Lab

    Principles of constructing and delivering expository sermons. Students will preach in class for evaluation by instructor and peers.

    REL 315
    PST 101

    Instructor

    Schedule
    Tue 5:00 PM 6:15 PM
    Location
    RE LL120
    Synchronous
    Semester
    Winter
  • PST 302 Practical Theology

    An examination of pastoral practices such as baptism, child dedication, funerals, communion, weddings, prayers for the sick, and public prayers. Students will consider these practices in l