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Behavioural Science

BHS 229 Indigenous Ways of Knowing I (3) B

Students will explore Indigenous ways of knowing, the characteristics of this knowledge, and how these understandings influence interactions with the world and others. Discussion will consider the sources of Indigenous knowledge, the Indigenous ontology, epistemology and axiology as well as related values and ethics. Comparisons will be made between Indigenous and Western forms of knowledge to consider how these platforms can be used together in helping and teaching fields.

Prerequisite: PS 121 and SO 121

 

BHS 240 Research Methods (3–2L) A

This course is an introduction to the concepts and processes of quantitative and qualitative research. Research processes include problem definition, designing a study, selection and development of theory, literature review, data collection, interpretation and analysis of data, and writing the research report. Students will develop research skills through the practical application of material covered in class, in the text readings, and in weekly labs.

Prerequisite: Math 30-1 or Math 30-2, PS 121 or SO 121

 

BHS 299 Special Topics in Behavioural Science (3) O

Special studies in Behavioural Science, as announced.

Prerequisite: Permission of the department

 

BHS 304 Behavioural Science Education Travel Study (3) O

This course provides an introduction to international community development incorporating the disciplines of community psychology and the sociology of development.  It involves pre-reading assignments as well as post-travel written assignments that allow students to apply both theoretical and practical understandings of international community development. The practical component of the course involves volunteering for two weeks at a Two- Thirds World site, where students learn about community development first-hand. One of the main aims of the course is to help empower students to contribute to positive social change in both local and international communities.

 

BHS 310 Quantitative Methods for Behavioural Science (3-2L) A

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed on practical application and students will learn to analyze and interpret basic statistical research. They will also learn to use computer software (SPSS) to analyze data. Lecture and laboratory components. Class limit of 30 students.

Prerequisite: BHS 240 or permission of the department

 

BHS 311 Qualitative Research (3) B

This seminar style course examines the basic techniques for collecting, interpreting, and presenting qualitative data, drawing on research methodologies in areas such as ethnography, grounded theory, case studies, interviews, and focus groups. Special emphasis is given to the epistemological and ontological undercurrents to qualitative research methodology, and “lived experience,” or the process of humans constructing meaning through social interaction.

Prerequisite: BHS 240 and 3 credits in Sociology at the 300-level

Note: Students can only earn credit for one of the following: BHS 311 or BHS 415.

 

BHS 320 Field Practicum 1 (3–3L) A

A supervised practical experience with a community or social agency closely related to the student’s interest and/or future plans. Readings, written assignments and group meetings will help students reflect on and integrate knowledge with practical experience.

Prerequisite: BHS 240. Restricted to students in BA: Behavioural Science (Concentration or Major) with a CGPA of not less than 2.0. Permission of the department required.

 

BHS 329 Indigenous Ways of Knowing II (3) B

Students will continue to develop their understanding of Indigenous knowledge, perspectives and approaches, in order to further their knowledge of how Western and Indigenous approaches can be used together to support others in a culturally appropriate manner. Discussions will expand the student’s knowledge of cultural, spiritual and philosophical themes in Indigenous worldviews. Students will examine how Indigenous worldviews should inform professional practice through the discussion of historical, social, and political issues in helping and teaching fields.

Prerequisite: BHS 229

 

BHS 330 Psychology, Theology, and Indigenous Thinking (3) O

An exploration of knowledge production in post-colonial and indigenous contexts and theology through lecture and field-based learning. Students will explore cultural, regional, and social influences on rival epistemologies and bodies of accepted knowledge.

Prerequisite: REL 161 and PS 121 or SO 121

Note: This course is cross-listed as REL 330

 

BHS 350 Poverty in Western Society (3) B

This course will provide an overview of the origins and understanding of poverty in western society from both a theoretical and theological standpoint. This will include a review of the sources of vulnerability that contribute to poverty and the psycho-social impacts of poverty on vulnerable populations and the broader society. Strategic approaches to poverty reduction will be explored along with the respective roles of the church, state and civil society in preventing, alleviating and reducing poverty.

Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credits or permission of department

Note: This course is cross-listed as DVST 350

 

BHS 399 Special Topics in Behavioural Science (3) O

Special studies in Behavioural Science, as announced.

Prerequisite: Permission of the department

 

BHS 400 Seminar in Behavioural Science (3) A

An integrative capstone seminar based on the contributions of both sociology and psychology for understanding human behaviour. The course will integrate the method, academic content, and pragmatic application of those fields of knowledge to the social context of human behaviour and explore the ways this can lead to vocation and service in the world community. A variety of methodological, theoretical, and practical questions will be addressed.

Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the BA: Behavioural Science (Concentration or Major) programs in their final 15 credits of study. Permission of the department required.

 

BHS 404 Behavioural Science Educational Travel Study (3) O

This course provides an introduction to international community development incorporating the disciplines of community psychology and the sociology of development. It involves pre-reading assignments as well as post-travel written assignments that allow students to apply both theoretical and practical understandings of international community development. The practical component of the course involves volunteering for two weeks at a Two-Thirds World site, where students learn about community development first-hand. One of the main aims of the course is to help empower students to contribute to positive social change in both local and international communities.

 

BHS 405 Special Topics in Behavioural Science (3) O

Special studies in Behavioural Science, as announced.

Prerequisite: Permission of the department

 

BHS 410 Basic Multivariate Statistics (3–2L) A

Multivariate analysis as applied to behavioural science. Correlation, simple and multiple regression, discriminant function analysis, canonical correlation, factor analysis, theories and applications of behavioural measurement, reliability, and validity will be presented.

Prerequisite: BHS 240 and BHS 310

 

BHS 420 Field Practicum 2 (3–3L) A

A continuation of the supervised practical experience placement within a community or social agency related to the student’s interest and/or future plans. Seminars will focus on the relationship between ethical issues and practical issues and models of ethical decision-making as related to the behavioural sciences.

Prerequisite: BHS 240. Restricted to students in the BA: Behavioural Science (Concentration or Major) with a CGPA of not less than 2.0. Permission of the department required.

 

BHS 450 Intersections between Poverty and Government Policy (3) B

This course will examine the intersection of social policy and government. Students will discover how governments work, the role of a lobbyist, how a law is formed, how a law is passed and what happens after the law is passed. The impact of a law, both positive and negative consequences, will be considered. The course will look at current Canadian social programs to determine if they empower people to move out of poverty. It will examine competing theories of anti-poverty and a range of approaches to research on poverty. Consideration will be given to welfare reform and alternative models such as Basic Income and Negative Income Tax. Students will visit the municipal council chambers to observe both council and standing policy committees. Finally, students will consider the structure of a National Poverty strategy.

Prerequisite: Completion of 60 credits or permission of the department